Internet Slang and Lingo For Teens and Tweens

Internet Slang and Lingo For Teens and Tweens

Internet Slang and Lingo For Teens and Tweens

 

Chatting with my 14 years old nephew has turned creepy recently because of the numerous abbreviations he uses while texting. I’ve tried to catch up with those acronyms and shortened words, but it’s really confusing. I can understand that using this kind of slang shortened words are easier than typing everything out and they still get the same point across. It just needs that the person who receives the message “unfortunately was me” understands them.

It may look weird for us as parents to use “totes” instead of “totally”,  however we have to admit that Language has changed a lot since the time we were teens. We have had our “code” language too, which doesn’t exist anymore. So as a parent, it’s important to be able to communicate with your kid and to understand and be aware of their activity online as well as in real life.

Though it’s difficult to keep up with the new language specially if you aren’t using it every day by texting your friends, it’s possible to learn some of the new way of communicating so that you can at least understand what your teen is talking about.

Here is a group of top lingos that amazed me:

  • Paw: Stands for “Parents are watching”, used to make sure no one says anything inappropriate while the parents are watching. Example: Alisa: “Don’t talk about what happened last night, paw”.
  • Usie: This is a play off of the term “selfie,” which means a photo you took of yourself. An “usie” is a photo taken of a group of people together by one of the group. Similarly, people have been calling pet selfies “pelfies.”
  • AITR: This acronym stands for “adults in the room.” This is something teens use if they are messaging someone online or texting and need to warn their friends not to write something they don’t want their parents to see, or tell someone why they aren’t responding. If you see this on your teen’s screen, they could be hiding something from you – or they could just want some privacy!
  • 911 sc: Refers to ” Emergency -Stop Chat” Example: My mom is- 911sc. This means: My mom is- hang on, there’s an emergency, I have to stop chatting.
  • Swag: Swag started off meaning money or goods. Example: “Check out this swag I got at the store.” Now, it can also be used as a substitute for “cool,” as in, “This shirt is really swag.”
  • FOMO:This acronym stands for Fear Of Missing Out. This is a form of social anxiety where someone is compulsively concerned about missing out on an event or interaction. This is most associated with modern technology and social networks, which enable us to be interacting constantly with our friends and with what’s happening in the world. If your teen seems to be compulsively checking his or her phone, they might be feeling FOMO.
  • Anon: This is a shortened version of “anonymous”. Example: Go on anon and ask me any question!
  • NGL:Stands for “not gonna lie.” Example “I really thought that was a bad performance, NGL.”
  • BOGO: Stands for ” buy one, get one “. Example Text: There’s a bogo sale at the mall today. Which means there’s a buy one, get one sale at the mall today.
  • 404: Originally a technical term for Not Found 404 (which is an error message seen on a Web page to indicate a requested URL was not found on a server), in slang to say “404” is to imply someone is clueless.  Example:  “There’s no use asking him; he’s 404, dude.”
  • 9009L3: refers to “Google”. Example: 9009l3 saves the day again which means : Google saves the day again.
  • Bbwe: stands for “be back whenever” Example Text: bbwe don’t wait for me. which means : I’ll be back whenever, don’t wait for me.
  • Avvie: This is a play off of the term “Avatar”. Example Text: I want to make a better avvie.
  • Ays: stands for ” Are you serious?”. Example: ays you can’t just turn around and stab him in the back like that.
  • And much more…

 So what is your favorite slang or acronym?

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